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Carter reads the newspaper / written by Deborah Hopkinson ; illustrated by Don Tate.

Hopkinson, Deborah, (author.). Tate, Don, (illustrator.).

Available copies

  • 2 of 2 copies available at Sage Library System. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Union County Public Libraries. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Cook Memorial Library - La Grande .

Current holds

0 current holds with 2 total copies.

Summary:

"Carter G. Woodson was born ten years after the end of the Civil War, to parents who had both been enslaved. Their stories were not the ones written about in history books, but Carter learned them and kept them in his heart. Carter's father could not read or write, but he believed in being an informed citizen. So Carter read the newspaper to him every day, and from this practice, he learned about the world and how to find out what he didn't know. Many years later, when he was a student at Harvard University (the second African-American and the only child of enslaved parents to do so), one of his professors said that black people had no history. Carter knew that wasn't true--and he set out to make sure the rest of us knew as well"--Provided by the publisher.
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Circulation Modifier Age Hold Protection Active/Create Date Status Due Date
Cook Memorial Library - La Grande JE Hopkinson, D (Text) 35178001814212 Juvenile Easy Book Branch_Only_3months 08/06/2020 Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781561459346
  • ISBN: 1561459348
  • Physical Description: 1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 25 x 29 cm
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: Atlanta : Peachtree, [2019]

Content descriptions

Summary, etc.:
"Carter G. Woodson was born ten years after the end of the Civil War, to parents who had both been enslaved. Their stories were not the ones written about in history books, but Carter learned them and kept them in his heart. Carter's father could not read or write, but he believed in being an informed citizen. So Carter read the newspaper to him every day, and from this practice, he learned about the world and how to find out what he didn't know. Many years later, when he was a student at Harvard University (the second African-American and the only child of enslaved parents to do so), one of his professors said that black people had no history. Carter knew that wasn't true--and he set out to make sure the rest of us knew as well"--Provided by the publisher.
Target Audience Note:
810L Lexile
Subject: Woodson, Carter Godwin, 1875-1950 > Juvenile literature.
Woodson, Carter Godwin, 1875-1950 > Books and reading > Juvenile literature.
African American historians > Biography > Juvenile literature.
Historians > United States > Juvenile literature.
African American historians > Juvenile literature.
Historians > Juvenile literature.
African Americans > Juvenile biography.
Genre: Biographies.
Summary: "Carter G. Woodson was born ten years after the end of the Civil War, to parents who had both been enslaved. Their stories were not the ones written about in history books, but Carter learned them and kept them in his heart. Carter's father could not read or write, but he believed in being an informed citizen. So Carter read the newspaper to him every day, and from this practice, he learned about the world and how to find out what he didn't know. Many years later, when he was a student at Harvard University (the second African-American and the only child of enslaved parents to do so), one of his professors said that black people had no history. Carter knew that wasn't true--and he set out to make sure the rest of us knew as well"--Provided by the publisher.

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