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Thirteen clocks : how race united the colonies and made the Declaration of Independence

Available copies

  • 0 of 1 copy available at Sage Library System. (Show)
  • 0 of 1 copy available at Union County Public Libraries. (Show)
  • 0 of 1 copy available at Cook Memorial Library - La Grande .

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0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Summary:

"In his celebrated account of the origins of American unity, John Adams described July 1776 as the moment when thirteen clocks managed to strike at the same time. So how did these American colonies overcome long odds to create a durable union capable of declaring independence from Britain? In this powerful new history of the fifteen tense months that culminated in the Declaration of Independence, Robert G. Parkinson provides a troubling answer: racial fear. Tracing the circulation of information in the colonial news systems that linked patriot leaders and average colonists, Parkinson reveals how the system's participants constructed a compelling drama featuring virtuous men who suddenly found themselves threatened by ruthless Indians and defiant slaves acting on behalf of the king. Parkinson argues that patriot leaders used racial prejudices to persuade Americans to declare independence. Between the Revolutionary War's start at Lexington and the Declaration, they broadcast any news they could find about Native Americans, enslaved Blacks, and Hessian mercenaries working with their British enemies. American independence thus owed less to the love of liberty than to the exploitation of colonial fears about race. Thirteen Clocks offers an accessible history of the Revolution that uncovers the uncomfortable origins of the republic even as it speaks to our own moment"--
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Circulation Modifier Age Hold Protection Active/Create Date Status Due Date
Cook Memorial Library - La Grande 305.8 P248 (Text) 35178001855348 New Adult Non-Fiction Book Branch_Only_3months 07/30/2021 Checked out 10/08/2021

Record details

  • ISBN: 1469662574
  • ISBN: 9781469662572
  • Physical Description: xxi, 232 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
    print
  • Publisher: Williamsburg, Virginia : Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture ; [2021]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Formatted Contents Note: Preface -- List of illustrations -- Abbreviations -- Introduction -- Newspapers on the Eve of the Revolutionary War -- The Long Odds against American Unity in the 1770s -- The "Shot Heard round the World" Revisited -- "Britain Has Found Means to Unite Us" -- A Rolling Snowball -- Merciless Savages, Domestic Insurrectionists, and Foreign Mercenaries -- Founding Stories -- Notes -- Guide to Further Reading -- Index.
Summary, etc.: "In his celebrated account of the origins of American unity, John Adams described July 1776 as the moment when thirteen clocks managed to strike at the same time. So how did these American colonies overcome long odds to create a durable union capable of declaring independence from Britain? In this powerful new history of the fifteen tense months that culminated in the Declaration of Independence, Robert G. Parkinson provides a troubling answer: racial fear. Tracing the circulation of information in the colonial news systems that linked patriot leaders and average colonists, Parkinson reveals how the system's participants constructed a compelling drama featuring virtuous men who suddenly found themselves threatened by ruthless Indians and defiant slaves acting on behalf of the king. Parkinson argues that patriot leaders used racial prejudices to persuade Americans to declare independence. Between the Revolutionary War's start at Lexington and the Declaration, they broadcast any news they could find about Native Americans, enslaved Blacks, and Hessian mercenaries working with their British enemies. American independence thus owed less to the love of liberty than to the exploitation of colonial fears about race. Thirteen Clocks offers an accessible history of the Revolution that uncovers the uncomfortable origins of the republic even as it speaks to our own moment"--
Subject: Racism United States History 18th century
United States History Revolution, 1775-1783 Propaganda
United States History Revolution, 1775-1783 Social aspects

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